Stanley girl now thriving and smiling through scoliosis diagnosis

STANLEY, Wis. (WSAW) -- The Children's Hospital in Marshfield has been a critical asset for families living in central Wisconsin, and the care they give their child patients has been unmatched for the families of the five miracle kids in 2019, like Morgan Halls.

"She's like a ball of sunshine," Roger Halls said, describing his daughter.

Morgan is 12 years old.

"She's just a really, really sweet kid," added her mom, Carrie Halls.

Morgan has a lot to keep her busy outside of school.

"I really like to draw. I like singing and dancing," Morgan said. "But I can't dance because I'm not allowed to."

That's because she has a type of scoliosis.

"At first I called it bent bones," Morgan said.

Her diagnosis was so severe, Morgan had to wear a back brace at age five.

"She has other issues with her ribs and other bones that didn't form correctly when she was growing," explained Carrie.

But her parents say she loved the back brace.

"She thought it was the coolest thing she'd ever seen," her dad said, laughing. "Her strength inspires me."

Morgan has had several surgeries throughout the years.

"She got rods implanted to help her grow straight around her curve, because there's parts of it we can't fix," Carrie added.

Through every surgery, the child life specialists were there. Morgan said they are the best people she ever met. They gave plenty of comfort and offered plenty of fun and Gave presents for milestones, like walking.

"Had me have a little spa day in the hospital," Morgan excitedly said.

"They just do all those little things to make them feel special," said her mom.

Morgan was so inspired by their kindness, she one day wants to be a nurse too, and to enjoy life with only one more adjustment and one more surgery.

"I know life gets tough, but sometimes you just got to push through," she said.

The Children's Miracle Network Radiothon is this Thursday and Friday. Your donations will help fund the latest hospital technology, child life services and expense therapies, support research and provide assistance for families, just like Morgan's.