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Cracking the code to the most common type of Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Published: Mar. 30, 2021 at 4:50 PM CDT
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WAUSAU, Wis. (WSAW) - After 40 years of research, we have finally cracked the code to the most common type of non small cell lung cancer. This type of cancer is called the KRAS and is quite common in many types of cancers. The exciting new treatment is focused on non small cell lung cancer patients .

This is the first time KRAS lung cancer patients have been so close to a treatment. The clinical trials have finished, and the FDA is expected to complete their review process in the next few months. If the treatment is approved, doctors would, for the first time, be able to prescribe a targeted therapy drug to their KRAS lung cancer patients who are eligible for treatment.

Now, when a patient is first diagnosed with cancer, it is imperative to get a biomarker test which determines what makes a cancer cell unique. And, because of the discovery of biomarkers, many cancers can be treated with targeted therapies. Research is uncovering new biomarkers and treatments so more and more cancers can be treated by just taking a pill – many times with no surgeries, no chemotherapy and no radiation.

Not only does this mean there are now additional options for treating cancers, outside of chemotherapy, radiation and surgery - this type of research will lead to additional breakthroughs, meaning that there will be new options for treating cancer patients. And, for lung cancer patients this research not only provides hope, this research is life.

Joining NewsChannel 7 at 4′s Deep Bench was Dr. Hossein Borghaei, Chief in the Division of Thoracic Medical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia and Terri Conneran, lung cancer-KRAS Patient and founder of KRAS Kickers, an online support group.

You can find out more information and join the cause to fund more research by going to lcfameria.org or texting lcfamerica to 41444.

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