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Seven day average for new coronavirus cases continues to fall, state reports one new death

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Coronavirus generic(WRDW)
Published: Jan. 17, 2021 at 2:39 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – One day after reporting a record amount of COVID-19 related deaths within a single 24-hour period in Wisconsin, state health officials say one person has died from the illness brought on by the coronavirus since Saturday.

In addition to a low amount of deaths reported by the Department of Health Services (DHS), the state also reported another day of fewer than 2,000 new cases of the coronavirus Sunday.

The state received 6,674 results for people getting tested for the coronavirus for the first time. About 24% of these were positive, identifying 1,606 new cases. The DHS has reported fewer than 2,000 new cases in four out of the past eight days.

It’s also the eighth day in a row with fewer than 3,000 new cases reported by the state, and the seventh time in 8 days the positivity rate was below 30%.

The 7-day average fell from 2,161 a day Saturday to 2,129 cases per day on Sunday. That average has fallen daily since January 11.

With one new death reported by the state, the 7-day average for deaths held steady at 42 from Saturday. On Friday, that figure was at 29. The state’s death rate decreased slightly Sunday from 1.05% to 1.04%.

According to the state, the lone death reported Sunday was in Milwaukee County.

Keep in mind state numbers are typically lower on Sundays.

As of Friday, the Wisconsin DHS reports 213,056 total doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered since December 14. That’s 17,904 more “shots in the arm” of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine than the state’s update on Thursday afternoon. Totals are preliminary and at least a day behind while the state reviews information from vaccinators. State graphs indicate the record was set on Wednesday [updated for clarification]. By our calculations, vaccinators averaged 11,397 shots a day over the past 7 days.

The DHS reports 30,805 people have finished their vaccination series -- that is, received their second dose.

County-by-county case and death numbers are listed later in this article.

The DHS also tracks results for people tested multiple times, such as health care workers or patients being treated for COVID-19. By that measure, the DHS calculates the positivity rate’s 7-day average has fallen again to 8.0%, from 8.1% on Saturday. The state received a total of 15,343 results, and 1,521 were positive. These numbers are preliminary and always at least a day behind the DHS daily summary; they include negative tests undergoing further review. Reporting one test per person, no matter how many times they’re tested, is considered a better indicator of the virus’s spread in the community and is how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles its own reports.

In addition, the DHS reported 50 people were hospitalized for COVID-19 symptoms during a 24-hour period that ended Sunday morning. A total of 23,076 people have been hospitalized in Wisconsin since the virus reached our state, or 4.4% of all known cases.

So far, 2,959,588 people in Wisconsin have been tested for the coronavirus since last year. The state has identified 521,794 cases, and 490,043 of these people (93.9%) are considered recovered (though may still have lingering effects from their infections.) There are 26,139 active cases (5.0%) diagnosed or experiencing symptoms in the past 30 days who haven’t been medically cleared.

Phase 1b

The DHS is now accepting public comments on recommendations for who should receive the COVID-19 vaccine in the next round, known as phase 1b. A DHS subcommittee recommended three broad groups: People over 70, people in congregate settings (such as jails, homeless shelters, and employer housing) that weren’t included in phase 1a, and more essential workers (including educators in face-to-face learning and first responders and health care workers who weren’t included in phase 1a). The plan covers 1 in 5 people in Wisconsin. Read details of the recommendations and how to submit public comments HERE.

As reported by our sister station, Wisconsin grocers are pushing to be included during the phase 1B vaccination.

You can see a graph of vaccinations per day by county or Healthcare Emergency Readiness Coalition (HERC) at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-data.htm#day (use the pulldown menu at the upper right corner of the graph). Keep in mind these numbers are preliminary until undergoing a few days of review.

Hospitalizations

The Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) says 853 COVID-19 patients, including 207 in ICU, are currently being treated in hospitals in the state. That’s 5 fewer patients in ICU and 58 fewer patients overall compared to Saturday. The total amount of patients is the first time that figure has been below 900 since October 11. Sunday’s total amount of patients currently hospitalized is also the sixth time in 7 days there were fewer than 1,000 current hospitalizations.

Fox Valley region hospitals were treating 70 COVID-19 patients, including 6 in ICU. That’s three more in the ICU from Saturday, and an overall increase of 8.

Northeast region hospitals were treating 82 COVID-19 patients, with 23 in ICU – five fewer ICU patients and seven fewer patients overall in the past day.

Daily changes in hospitalization numbers take discharges, deaths and new admissions into account.

On Sunday, the alternate care facility at State Fair Park didn’t have any patients receiving outpatient Bamlanivimab infusion therapy. It also didn’t have any overflow COVID-19 patients from state hospitals. There were no overflow patients or infusion therapy patients there on Saturday.

Hospital Readiness

The WHA reports Saturday the state’s 134 hospitals have 287 of their 1,466 ICU beds open (19.57%) and 2,301 of all types of medical beds (20.59%) open -- ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation.

The Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals had 14 ICU beds (13.46%) and 111 medical beds total (13.01%) open for the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals had 40 ICU beds (19.32%) and 277 of all medical beds (28.97%) open for patients in seven counties.

These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19, and whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the necessary medical and support staff.

SUNDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold) *

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,425 cases (+1) (11 deaths)
  • Ashland – 1,085 cases (+6) (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 4,889 cases (+28) (64 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 995 cases (18 deaths)
  • Brown – 28,282 cases (+58) (178 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 1,178 cases (+7) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,059 cases (+2) (23 deaths)
  • Calumet – 5,033 cases (+10) (38 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 6,513 cases (+29) (72 deaths)
  • Clark – 2,989 cases (+8) (54 deaths)
  • Columbia – 4,615 cases (+39) (37 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1,619 cases (+3) (13 deaths)
  • Dane – 36,433 cases (+136) (218 deaths)
  • Dodge – 10,919 cases (+20) (129 deaths)
  • Door – 2,276 cases (+7) (16 deaths)
  • Douglas – 3,366 cases (+5) (17 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,843 cases (+21) (25 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 10,106 cases (+47) (92 deaths)
  • Florence - 412 cases (+1) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 11,169 cases (+9) (73 deaths)
  • Forest - 893 cases (22 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,335 cases (+10) (77 deaths)
  • Green – 2,546 cases (+11) (10 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 1,445 cases (+4) (14 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,758 cases (+1) (8 deaths)
  • Iron - 445 cases (19 deaths)
  • Jackson - 2,492 cases (+3) (20 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 7,219 cases (+11) (63 deaths)
  • Juneau - 2,783 cases (+15) (13 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 13,676 cases (+36) (248 deaths)
  • Kewaunee – 2,238 cases (+3) (26 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 11,025 cases (+20) (67 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 1,325 cases (+1) (7 deaths)
  • Langlade - 1,868 cases (30 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,703 cases (+5) (51 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 6,675 cases (+32) (57 deaths)
  • Marathon – 12,883 cases (+50) (167 deaths)
  • Marinette - 3,794 cases (+13) (55 deaths)
  • Marquette – 1,222 cases (+11) (20 deaths)
  • Menominee - 770 cases (11 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 91,534 (+264) (1,083 deaths) (+1)
  • Monroe – 3,847 cases (+19) (27 deaths)
  • Oconto – 4,048 cases (+3) (43 deaths)
  • Oneida - 3,018 cases (+10) (49 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 17,634 cases (+61) (169 deaths)
  • Ozaukee – 7,010 cases (+20) (63 deaths)
  • Pepin – 753 cases (+2) (6 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,182 cases (+4) (32 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,389 cases (+13) (30 deaths)
  • Portage – 5, 249 cases (+25) (57 deaths)
  • Price – 1,013 cases (+9) (6 deaths)
  • Racine – 19,117 cases (+71) (276 deaths)
  • Richland - 1,185 cases (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 13,218 cases (+56) (129 deaths)
  • Rusk - 1,190 cases (+3) (14 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,867 cases (+12) (34 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 1,333 cases (+4) (17 deaths)
  • Shawano – 4,391 cases (+7) (64 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 12,149 cases (+31) (108 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 5,842 cases (+24) (35 deaths)
  • Taylor - 1,695 cases (+2) (19 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 3,186 cases (+8) (33 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,662 cases (+8) (32 deaths)
  • Vilas - 1,806 cases (+7) (31 deaths)
  • Walworth – 8,321 cases (+20) (114 deaths)
  • Washburn – 1,151 cases (+3) (15 deaths)
  • Washington – 12,813 cases (+28) (108 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 37,617 cases (+108) (392 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 4,435 cases (+41) (102 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,996 cases (+3) (24 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 16,055 cases (+42) (165 deaths)
  • Wood – 6,112 cases (+35) (63 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger - 224 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga - 479 cases (29 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 664 cases (16 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,570 cases (60 deaths)
  • Dickinson - 2,056 cases (56 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 769 cases (16 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,832 cases (27 deaths)
  • Iron – 819 cases (32 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 91 cases (1 death)
  • Luce – 128 cases
  • Mackinac - 270 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 3,316 cases (52 deaths)
  • Menominee - 1,547 cases (34 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 288 cases (15 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft - 223 cases (3 deaths)

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it.
  • Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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