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D.C. Everest teaches students to be open about bullying

Chapman said it’s really up to the community to squash the bullying cycle, and be on the same page when it comes to the definition of bullying so that they can handle those situations correctly.
Published: Oct. 14, 2020 at 6:29 AM CDT
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WAUSAU, Wis. (WSAW) -

October is National Bullying Prevention week.

While the D.C. Everest School District engages in Phase Two; a two-month-long bully prevention training every December, the district is encouraging teachers, parents, and students to work on their verbal skills daily, and speak up when they see or are a part of something bad.

Through their curriculum, the district is looking to teach their students that their words and actions have power, and can stop a bully from hurting others.

“Really what I think and what we think is that bullying prevention is teaching kids, good conflict resolution skills, good problem-solving skills. And then what to do when there is a real bullying situation,” Deborah Chapman, the School Counselor At Rothschild Elementary School said.

In the DC Everest School District, their students are taught to recognize if it is bullying, report it to an adult, and learn how to refuse it, by putting yourself in a happier situation.

Chapman said it’s really up to the community to squash the bullying cycle, and be on the same page when it comes to the definition of bullying so that they can handle those situations correctly.

“Lots of kids will say to me, you know, Mr. Chapman, I’m not comfortable. I just can’t say to that other person don’t do that because like what if it happens to me too? And that’s why we talk about ‘you don’t have to be best friends to be kind’,” Chapman explained.

They define bullying as a series of mean events that happen regularly to a victim, that doesn’t stop no matter what they do.

Since the district started the training just a few years ago, the school said they have seen the number of bullying cases go down, and the confidence of their students goes up.

They say these results prove just how important it is to teach these lessons at a young age, making better communicating future leaders.

When it comes to talking to your children about bullying, Chapman said not to be intimidated.

She said that That having these conversations shouldn’t just happen when you suspect something bad is happening at school, but every day,

By just asking your child how their day was and keeping a note of the ups and downs, most of the time families can catch problems before they get really bad.

Chapman said if you find your children are being bullied it is super important to reach out to school officials right away if the student hasn’t already.

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