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More than 1,700 new coronavirus tests come back positive Monday, state reports 2 new deaths

This breaks a four day streak of more than 2,000 tests with positive results
WISCONSIN state map with CORONAVIRUS lettering, on texture, finished graphic
WISCONSIN state map with CORONAVIRUS lettering, on texture, finished graphic(Associated Press)
Published: Sep. 28, 2020 at 2:22 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Out of more than 7,000 new test results released Monday, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reports more than 1,700 came back positive for the coronavirus. This breaks a four day streak of more than 2,000 tests with positive results.

The 1,726 newly confirmed cases brings the state’s total to 117,588 people who have tested positive for the virus since testing began on February 5. That’s 15,090 more cases than seven days ago.

According to the DHS, the state received 7,885 test results on Monday, bringing the positive rate of Monday’s test results to 21.9%, a decrease from Sunday’s report of 27.6%.

Wisconsin has added an average 2,155 cases per day for the past 7 days, an increase from Sunday’s seven day average of 2,091. The 14-day average also rose again, up to 2,028 cases per day. The two week average includes multiple days of more than 2,000 positive tests being returned.

The state has added more than 11,000 coronavirus cases in the last five days (11,656).

The DHS says two people died within the past 24 hours, bringing the COVID-19 death toll to 1,283. The death rate from known cases is now at 1.09%, a percentage which has decreased since Friday.

As of Monday, the state had more than 19,000 active cases (19,560), increasing that metric to 16.6% of all coronavirus cases since February 5. Another 96,727 people (82.3%) are considered medically cleared or passed 30 days since their diagnosis or onset of symptoms.

47 more patients were hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment within the past 24 hours, for a total 7,142 coronavirus patients being hospitalized in Wisconsin at some point. Wisconsin’s 7-day average is 64 COVID-19 hospitalizations per day.

As of Monday, the number of currently hospitalized COVID-19 patients reported by the Wisconsin Hospitalization Association is at 640, 69 fewer than Sunday. Of these, 173 are in intensive care, seven more than Sunday.

The report on hospital readiness updated Monday shows 20% of licensed medical beds statewide are available. In the 7-county Northeast Region, there were 89 COVID-19 patients (26 in ICU) and 26% of beds were open. The 8-county Fox Valley Region had 103 patients (10 in ICU) and 14% of beds available. Those numbers are unchanged since Sunday.

Dr. Rai expressed concern Thursday on Action 2 News This Morning about the number of people being hospitalized. “We have many more in the hospital now than we did in the outbreak of the spring, the first time that we had gotten really bad. Now it’s much worse,” he said. He noted hospitals still need to provide care for others, “from somebody having a stroke to a heart attack to breaking their hip or needing knee surgery.”

The percentage of hospitalizations from all known coronavirus cases declined to 6.1% -- a metric we’ve seen steadily go down. The sharp increase in cases and steady decline in the death toll can be attributed to better treatments but even more to the virus spreading among young adults. They’re less likely to suffer the serious symptoms of the coronavirus that require hospitalization -- in fact, may show no symptoms at all -- but can still spread the virus to others and to vulnerable populations.

Gov. Tony Evers extended the face mask order last week, and declared a new public health emergency. Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately -- over the nose and chin.

[CLICK HERE to find a community testing site]

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. Going beyond reiterating best practices like social distancing and wearing masks, the tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 253 cases (+2) (4 deaths)
  • Ashland - 110 cases (Change from Sunday’s DHS report of 130) (2 deaths)
  • Barron - 478 cases (+12) (5 deaths) (+1)
  • Bayfield - 105 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Brown - 8,985 cases (+88) (62 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 140 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 194 cases (+4) (3 deaths)
  • Calumet - 1,183 cases (+39) (3 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 555 cases (+9)
  • Clark – 402 cases (+5) (8 deaths)
  • Columbia - 645 cases (+23) (2 deaths)
  • Crawford – 168 cases (+4)
  • Dane – 9,763 cases (+156) (41 deaths)
  • Dodge – 1,884 cases (+47) (16 deaths)
  • Door - 340 cases (+11) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 489 cases (+34)
  • Dunn - 556 cases (+29)
  • Eau Claire - 1,940 cases (+53) (6 deaths)
  • Florence - 94 cases (+3) (2 deaths) (+1)
  • Fond du Lac – 2,121 cases (+76) (13 deaths)
  • Forest - 274 cases (+2) (4 deaths)
  • Grant – 1,016 cases (+13) (19 deaths)
  • Green - 526 cases (+11) (3 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 286 cases (+9)
  • Iowa - 186 cases (+3)
  • Iron - 142 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 150 cases (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 1,430 cases (+12) (8 deaths)
  • Juneau - 382 cases (+3) (2 deaths)
  • Kenosha - 3,522 cases (+11) (65 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 540 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 3,055 cases (+8) (2 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 289 cases (+6)
  • Langlade - 198 cases (+12) (2 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 229 cases (+18) (1 death)
  • Manitowoc – 1,105 cases (+35) (3 deaths)
  • Marathon - 1,434 cases (+54) (14 deaths)
  • Marinette - 944 cases (+22) (8 deaths)
  • Marquette - 271 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 74 cases (+3)
  • Milwaukee – 28,692 (+157) (529 deaths)
  • Monroe - 540 cases (+13) (2 deaths)
  • Oconto - 881 cases (+3) (4 deaths)
  • Oneida - 449 cases (+6) (2 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 4,604 cases (+231) (29 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 1,355 cases (+2) (19 deaths)
  • Pepin – 67 cases
  • Pierce – 442 cases (+4) (7 deaths)
  • Polk – 248 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 1,464 cases (+49) (4 deaths)
  • Price - 110 cases (+3)
  • Racine - 4,908 cases (+51) (95 deaths)
  • Richland - 134 cases (4 deaths)
  • Rock – 2,573 cases (+33) (32 deaths)
  • Rusk - 62 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Sauk - 907 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 214 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Shawano – 922 cases (+58) (1 death)
  • Sheboygan - 1,594 cases (+16) (16 deaths)
  • St. Croix - 934 cases (+20) (8 deaths)
  • Taylor - 191 cases (+7) (4 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 634 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 234 cases (+6)
  • Vilas - 217 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Walworth - 2,584 cases (35 deaths)
  • Washburn – 107 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Washington - 2,604 cases (32 deaths)
  • Waukesha - 7,362 cases (+108) (87 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 1,065 cases (+22) (20 deaths)
  • Waushara - 358 cases (+10) (2 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 3,809 cases (+128) (26 deaths)
  • Wood - 829 cases (+3) (5 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

  • Alger - 17 cases
  • Baraga - 22 cases (+2) (1 death) (+1)
  • Chippewa - 50 cases
  • Delta – 419 cases (+52) (8 deaths) (+1)
  • Dickinson – 140 cases (+12) (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 148 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Houghton – 415 cases (+20) (1 death) (Reflects change from state report of 2)
  • Iron – 175 cases (+16) (2 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 10 cases (+2)
  • Luce – 12 cases
  • Mackinac - 44 cases (+2)
  • Marquette - 319 cases (+13) (12 deaths)
  • Menominee - 342 cases (+17) (1 death)
  • Ontonagon – 41 cases
  • Schoolcraft - 25 cases

*The State of Michigan says it will only report county case numbers Monday-Saturday. State health officials say weekend data are often erratic and generally lower than other days due to reduced testing and lab staffing.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

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