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DHS: Wisconsin sees third day of more than 2,000 positive tests, death toll from COVID-19 drops slightly

Coronavirus
Coronavirus(Source: CDC/NIH/NIAID-RML/CNN)
Published: Sep. 19, 2020 at 2:18 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – For the third day in a row, Wisconsin health officials say more than 2,000 people have tested positive for the coronavirus.

On Saturday, the Department of Health Services said 2,283 more people have tested positive for the virus. That’s down from Friday’s one-day record of 2,533 cases. New cases were reported in all but two out of Wisconsin’s 72 counties.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) received 12,472 test results Saturday, with 18.3% being positive.

The average daily case number increased as well. Wisconsin averaged 1,417 cases a day over the past 7 days. That is a decrease from Friday’s seven day average of 1,576. The DHS is urging people to take precautions that are well-publicized: Wear a face mask, avoid groups, stay six feet between you and people who aren’t from your household, wash your hands often, stay home if you have symptoms.

At the current rate, Wisconsin will cross the milestone of 100,000 coronvirus cases either by Sunday or early next week. Testing has so far confirmed 99,562 coronavirus cases since February 5.

The DHS says 13,671 people are active cases, or 13.7% of the all-time cases. That number and percentage are increases from Friday’s report of 12,839 active cases and 13.2%. There are 84,632 patients who are considered recovered.

The state reported three new deaths, bringing COVID-19′s death toll to 1,241. That’s 1.24% of known cases, which is a new low. The previous low was set on Friday, with 1.27% of all confirmed cases being fatal. The new deaths were reported in Fond du Lac, Juneau, and Portage counties.

[CLICK HERE to find a community testing site]

50 more COVID-19 patients were hospitalized in the past 24 hours. The latest numbers available are from Friday, showing 342 COVID-19 patients were in hospitals with 98 in intensive care, both having decreased since Friday.

To date, the DHS says 6.6% of all people who have been confirmed to test positive for the virus have been hospitalized, a total of 6,619.

The sharp increase in cases and steady decline in the death toll can be attributed to better treatments but mostly due to more cases being found among young adults, an age group that’s less likely to suffer the serious effects of the coronavirus that require hospitalization -- in fact, may show no symptoms but can still spread the virus.

The DHS only counts a person once, no matter how many times they are tested.

According to the DHS, there are currently 113 labs doing testing, with a daily testing capacity of 38,563. Another 24 labs are still planning to do testing.

At the time of this writing on Saturday, there were more than 198,940 deaths attributed to COVID-19 in the United States, which is 20.86% of the world’s 953,562 COVID-19 deaths recorded by Johns Hopkins University. For comparison, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates anywhere from 24,000 to 62,000 influenza-related deaths in the U.S. during the last flu season, from October 2019 to April 2020 (some states don’t track the flu or report flu-related deaths, which is why the estimate is so varied). Worldwide there are a reported 30.3 million coronavirus cases, with 6.7 million of those in the U.S.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services introduced a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. Going beyond reiterating best practices like social distancing and wearing masks, the tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

County case numbers (counties with new cases or deaths are in bold) are as reported by the DHS. State numbers can vary from county health department numbers, which are updated at different times:

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 192 cases (+9) (3 deaths)
  • Ashland - 53 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Barron - 411 cases (+4) (4 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 78 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Brown - 7,400 cases (+217) (59 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 118 cases (Adjusted from Friday’s DHS report of 119) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 114 cases (+13) (3 deaths)
  • Calumet - 854 cases (+35) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 466 cases (+10)
  • Clark – 320 cases (+7) (8 deaths)
  • Columbia - 493 cases (+15) (2 deaths)
  • Crawford – 139 cases (+4)
  • Dane – 8,635 cases (+180) (41 deaths)
  • Dodge – 1,573 cases (+35) (9 deaths)
  • Door - 234 cases (+14) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 376 cases (+17)
  • Dunn - 351 cases (+32)
  • Eau Claire - 1,527 cases (+51) (6 deaths)
  • Florence - 58 cases (+5)
  • Fond du Lac - 1,706 cases (+51) (13 deaths) (+1)
  • Forest - 207 cases (+12) (4 deaths)
  • Grant - 782 cases (+79) (19 deaths)
  • Green - 429 cases (+34) (2 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 186 cases (+17)
  • Iowa - 144 cases (+2)
  • Iron - 136 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 107 cases (+8) (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 1,192 cases (+26) (7 deaths)
  • Juneau - 315 cases (+13) (2 deaths) (+1)
  • Kenosha - 3,257 cases (+41) (65 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 366 cases (+16) (2 deaths)
  • La Crosse - 2,475 cases (+100) (2 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 211 cases (+7)
  • Langlade - 122 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 132 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Manitowoc - 842 cases (+36) (2 deaths)
  • Marathon - 1008 cases (+32) (14 deaths)
  • Marinette - 724 cases (+17) (7 deaths)
  • Marquette - 176 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 43 cases (+1) (0 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 26,652 (+250) (521 deaths)
  • Monroe - 378 cases (+17) (2 deaths)
  • Oconto - 645 cases (+22) (4 deaths)
  • Oneida - 325 cases (+13) (2 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 3,414 cases (+137) (27 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 1,186 cases (+13) (19 deaths)
  • Pepin - 55 cases (+1)
  • Pierce – 379 cases (+15) (6 deaths)
  • Polk – 219 cases (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 1,127 cases (+41) (4 deaths) (+1)
  • Price - 50 cases (+7)
  • Racine - 4,419 cases (+42) (94 deaths)
  • Richland - 86 cases (+1) (4 deaths)
  • Rock – 2,207 cases (+45) (32 deaths)
  • Rusk - 48 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Sauk - 785 cases (+8) (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 195 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Shawano – 513 cases (+43) (1 death)
  • Sheboygan - 1,434 cases (+19) (14 deaths)
  • St. Croix - 798 cases (+25) (8 deaths)
  • Taylor - 147 cases (+3) (3 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 526 cases (+14) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 167 cases (+3)
  • Vilas - 166 cases (+9) (1 death)
  • Walworth - 2,421 cases (+47) (34 deaths)
  • Washburn – 91 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Washington - 2,212 cases (+56) (32 deaths)
  • Waukesha - 6,545 cases (+93) (85 deaths)
  • Waupaca - 894 cases (+30) (20 deaths)
  • Waushara - 265 cases (+7) (2 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 2,596 cases (+137) (23 deaths) (+1)
  • Wood - 665 cases (+12) (3 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula*

  • Alger - 16 cases
  • Baraga - 8 cases
  • Chippewa - 50 cases
  • Delta – 223 cases (+6) (5 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 95 cases (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 141 cases (1 death)
  • Houghton – 239 cases (+12) (1 death)
  • Iron – 64 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Keweenaw – 6 cases
  • Luce – 11 cases (Revised by state from 19)
  • Mackinac - 38 cases
  • Marquette - 266 cases (+8) (12 deaths)
  • Menominee - 266 cases (+8) (1 death)
  • Ontonagon – 41 cases
  • Schoolcraft - 19 cases

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

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