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Wisconsin sets one-day record 2,034 coronavirus cases

It was the first time test results identified more than 2,000 cases in one day
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Coronavirus generic(WRDW)
Published: Sep. 17, 2020 at 2:11 PM CDT|Updated: Sep. 17, 2020 at 2:58 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - The latest 24-hour batch of test results identified 2,034 coronavirus cases in Wisconsin -- a new one-day record. It’s 452 more cases than the previous record of 1,582.

That’s 17.77% of the 11,445 test results that came back positive, which is the highest percentage for a day with more than 10,000 total test results (the highest percentage, 20.45%, resulted from 7,735 total tests).

New cases were identified in 67 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties.

The Department of Health Services says 11,595 cases are currently active, meaning they were identified in the past 30 days and patients haven’t been medically cleared. That’s 12.2% of all the state’s cases going back to February. A total 94,746 people have tested positive for the coronavirus in Wisconsin.

To date, 81,902 people have been medically cleared and are considered recovered. That’s 86.5% of cases, a percentage that’s been falling as testing finds more new cases. Testing has identified more than 1,000 new coronavirus cases 7 of the past 8 days.

The 7-day average is 1,409 new cases a day, a new high. The 14-day average is 1,206 new cases, also a new high.

An average of 15.12% of the tests performed in the past seven days came back positive, also a new high.

The state reports the COVID-19 death toll rose 3 to 1,231. That’s 1.30% of all known cases -- a new low, and a percentage that’s fallen from 1.41% a week ago. The DHS revised the death count in Menominee County -- the only COVID-19 death reported there. The state added the first COVID-19 death in Shawano County, along with deaths in Outagamie, Waupaca and Milwaukee counties.

Sixty-eight more patients were hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment in the past 24 hours. To date, 6,522 people have been hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment. Wednesday, which is the latest information available, there were 370 COVID-19 patients currently hospitalized with 103 in intensive care. Those numbers have risen over the past few days.

The sharp increase in cases and steady decline in the death toll can be attributed to better treatments but mostly due to more cases being found among young adults, an age group that’s less likely to suffer the serious symptoms of the coronavirus that require hospitalization -- in fact, may show no symptoms at all but can still spread the virus.

Age groupCases (% of 94,746)Hospitalizations (% of 6,522)Deaths (% of 1,231)
0-93,018 (3%)61 (2%)0 (0%)
10-1911,572 (12%)119 (1%)0 (0%)
20-2924,364 (26%)450 (2%)9 (1%)
30-3914,703 (16%)535 (4%)15 (1%)
40-4912,670 (13%)686 (5%)36 (3%)
50-5912,833 (14%)1,011 (8%)84 (7%)
60-698,292 (9%)1,307 (16%)204 (17%)
70-794,316 (5%)1,240 (29%)314 (26%)
80-892,133 (2%)846 (40%)351 (29%)
90+795 (1%)267 (34%)218 (18%)

Source: Wisconsin Department of Health Services

[CLICK HERE to find a community testing site]

As of Thursday, there were more than 197,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19 in the United States, which is 21% of the world’s 942,758 COVID-19 deaths recorded by Johns Hopkins University. For comparison, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates anywhere from 24,000 to 62,000 influenza-related deaths in the U.S. during the last flu season, from October 2019 to April 2020 (some states don’t track the flu or report flu-related deaths, which is why the estimate is so varied).

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services introduced a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. Going beyond reiterating best practices like social distancing and wearing masks, the tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

County case numbers (counties with new cases or deaths are in bold) are as reported by the DHS. State numbers can vary from county health department numbers, which are updated at different times:

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 181 cases (+7) (3 deaths)
  • Ashland - 48 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Barron - 405 cases (+2) (4 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 73 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Brown - 7,013 cases (+196) (59 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 117 cases (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 97 cases (2 deaths)
  • Calumet - 769 cases (+32) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 447 cases (+13)
  • Clark – 307 cases (+1) (8 deaths)
  • Columbia - 471 cases (+16) (2 deaths)
  • Crawford – 133 cases (+2)
  • Dane – 8,242 cases (+258) (41 deaths)
  • Dodge – 1,512 cases (+35) (9 deaths)
  • Door - 209 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 351 cases (+9)
  • Dunn - 289 cases (+34)
  • Eau Claire - 1,398 cases (+62) (6 deaths)
  • Florence - 52 cases (+1)
  • Fond du Lac - 1,582 cases (+61) (12 deaths)
  • Forest - 184 cases (+11) (4 deaths)
  • Grant - 673 cases (+36) (19 deaths)
  • Green - 384 cases (+13) (2 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 154 cases (+4)
  • Iowa - 138 cases
  • Iron - 136 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 96 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 1,133 cases (+20) (7 deaths)
  • Juneau - 293 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Kenosha - 3,206 cases (+23) (65 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 318 cases (+23) (2 deaths)
  • La Crosse - 2,121 cases (+110) (2 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 200 cases (+1)
  • Langlade - 118 cases (+6) (2 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 125 cases (+10) (1 death)
  • Manitowoc - 769 cases (+27) (2 deaths)
  • Marathon - 952 cases (+27) (14 deaths)
  • Marinette - 695 cases (+15) (7 deaths)
  • Marquette - 164 cases (+12) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 40 cases (+6) (0 deaths) (revised by state)
  • Milwaukee – 26,128 (+244) (519 deaths) (+1)
  • Monroe - 350 cases (+14) (2 deaths)
  • Oconto - 608 cases (+28) (4 deaths)
  • Oneida - 298 cases (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 3,117 cases (+141) (25 deaths) (+1)
  • Ozaukee - 1,151 cases (+27) (19 deaths)
  • Pepin - 53 cases (+1)
  • Pierce - 358 cases (+10) (6 deaths)
  • Polk – 214 cases (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 1,038 cases (+34) (3 deaths)
  • Price - 41 cases (+1)
  • Racine - 4,348 cases (+27) (94 deaths)
  • Richland - 80 cases (+4) (4 deaths)
  • Rock – 2,126 cases (+35) (32 deaths)
  • Rusk - 41 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Sauk - 758 cases (+28) (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 190 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Shawano – 440 cases (+19) (1 death) (+1)
  • Sheboygan - 1,317 cases (+23) (14 deaths) (+1)
  • St. Croix - 760 cases (+16) (7 deaths)
  • Taylor - 143 cases (+4) (3 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 499 cases (+8) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 158 cases (+10)
  • Vilas - 155 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Walworth - 2,332 cases (+50) (34 deaths)
  • Washburn – 85 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Washington - 2,108 cases (+57) (32 deaths)
  • Waukesha - 6,287 cases (+47) (85 deaths)
  • Waupaca - 841 cases (+10) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Waushara - 248 cases (+3) (2 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 2,252 cases (+84) (22 deaths)
  • Wood - 627 cases (+11) (3 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula*

  • Alger - 16 cases
  • Baraga - 8 cases
  • Chippewa - 44 cases
  • Delta – 215 cases (+9) (5 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 86 cases (+6) (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 140 cases (1 death)
  • Houghton – 204 cases (+9) (1 death)
  • Iron – 55 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Keweenaw - 7 cases (+1)
  • Luce – 12 cases (revised -1 by state)
  • Mackinac - 37 cases
  • Marquette - 248 cases (+2) (12 deaths) (+1)
  • Menominee - 254 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Ontonagon – 40 cases
  • Schoolcraft - 19 cases

*The State of Michigan says it will only report county case numbers Monday-Saturday. Health officials there say weekend data are often erratic and generally lower than other days due to reduced testing and lab staffing.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol

Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

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