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Coronavirus numbers largely unchanged Wednesday

The state reported 70 fewer tests, 60 more cases, and 2 fewer deaths than Tuesday
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Coronavirus generic(WRDW)
Published: Sep. 16, 2020 at 2:06 PM CDT|Updated: Sep. 16, 2020 at 2:31 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - The Wisconsin Department of Health Services coronavirus report on Wednesday was a lot like Tuesday’s. The state received 70 fewer tests, identified 60 more cases -- raising the percentage of positive tests one-half of one percent -- and reported 2 fewer deaths compared to Tuesday. Here are the numbers:

The state identified 1,408 new cases out of 12,196 tests, meaning 11.54% of tests came back positive. New cases were identified in all but 5 of the 72 counties, with only Brown and Milwaukee counties reporting triple-digit increases.

Eight more COVID-19 deaths were reported, with one death each in Brown, Dodge, Sheboygan, Waupaca, Ashland, Milwaukee, Ozaukee and Walworth counties. The death rate holds steady at 1.3% of known cases.

Forty-eight more people were hospitalized in the past 24 hours for COVID-19. The Wisconsin Hospital Association reports there are currently 343 COVID-19 patients hospitalized, with 95 in intensive care.

The percentage of active cases continues to rise. There are now 10,839 coronavirus cases identified within the past 30 days who have not been medically cleared, or 11.7% of all cases. There are 80,627 people who are considered recovered, which is 87% of all cases.

Because we’ve seen records set and broken over the past 7 days, the seven-day average is up to 1,340 cases per day. Six of the past 7 days have had more than 1,000 cases. The 14-day average is also at an all-time high of 1,113 cases per day.

A chart on the DHS website shows cases per capita are skyrocketing among 18- to 24-year-olds starting in mid-August when cases are declining among every other age group except 65+, which shows a very slight increase. People in their 20s now account for 26% of all confirmed coronavirus cases in the state, followed distantly by people in their 30s accounting for 16% of cases. People over 70 still make up the lion’s share of COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths.

The state reports 21% of licensed medical beds are available -- the low end of the range of 21% to 25% we’ve been seeing for weeks.

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula identified 41 new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hour period and two more COVID-19 deaths, including the first COVID-19 death in Menominee County.

So far there are more than 196,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19 in the United States, which is 21% of the world’s 937,111 COVID-19 deaths recorded by Johns Hopkins University.

For comparison, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates anywhere from 24,000 to 62,000 influenza-related deaths in the U.S. during the last flu season, from October 2019 to April 2020 (some states don’t track the flu or report flu-related deaths, which is why the estimate is so varied).

[CLICK HERE to find a community testing site]

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services introduced a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. Going beyond reiterating best practices like social distancing and wearing masks, the tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

County case numbers (counties with new cases or deaths are in bold) are as reported by the DHS. State numbers can vary from county health department numbers, which are updated at different times:

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 174 cases (+4) (3 deaths)
  • Ashland - 46 cases (+2) (2 deaths) (+1)
  • Barron - 403 cases (+2) (4 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 71 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Brown - 6,817 cases (+160) (59 deaths) (+1) (corrects case numbers from an earlier version of this report)
  • Buffalo - 114 cases (+3) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 90 cases (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Calumet - 737 cases (+24) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 434 cases (+11)
  • Clark – 306 cases (+9) (8 deaths)
  • Columbia - 455 cases (+8) (2 deaths)
  • Crawford – 131 cases (+1)
  • Dane – 7,984 cases (+88) (41 deaths)
  • Dodge – 1,477 cases (+18) (9 deaths) (+1)
  • Door - 204 cases (+12) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 342 cases (+6)
  • Dunn - 265 cases (+6)
  • Eau Claire - 1,336 cases (+70) (6 deaths)
  • Florence - 51 cases (+2)
  • Fond du Lac - 1,521 cases (+31) (12 deaths)
  • Forest - 173 cases (+6) (4 deaths)
  • Grant - 637 cases (+13) (19 deaths)
  • Green - 371 cases (+9) (2 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 150 cases (+4)
  • Iowa - 138 cases (+4)
  • Iron - 136 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 94 cases (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 1,113 cases (+16) (7 deaths)
  • Juneau - 285 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Kenosha - 3,183 cases (+17) (65 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 295 cases (+18) (2 deaths)
  • La Crosse - 2,011 cases (+122) (2 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 199 cases (+1)
  • Langlade - 112 cases (+11) (2 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 115 cases (1 death)
  • Manitowoc - 742 cases (+8) (2 deaths)
  • Marathon - 925 cases (+20) (14 deaths)
  • Marinette - 680 cases (+7) (7 deaths)
  • Marquette - 152 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 34 cases (1 death)
  • Milwaukee – 25,884 (+163) (518 deaths) (+1)
  • Monroe - 336 cases (+6) (2 deaths)
  • Oconto - 580 cases (+5) (4 deaths)
  • Oneida - 293 cases (+7) (2 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 2,976 cases (+88) (24 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 1,124 cases (+12) (19 deaths) (+1)
  • Pepin - 52 cases (+1)
  • Pierce - 348 cases (+7) (6 deaths)
  • Polk – 214 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 1,004 cases (+30) (3 deaths)
  • Price - 40 cases (+1)
  • Racine - 4,321 cases (+22) (94 deaths)
  • Richland - 76 cases (+2) (4 deaths)
  • Rock – 2,091 cases (+28) (32 deaths)
  • Rusk - 40 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Sauk - 730 cases (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 186 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Shawano – 421 cases (+14)
  • Sheboygan - 1,294 cases (+17) (13 deaths) (+1)
  • St. Croix - 742 cases (+9) (7 deaths)
  • Taylor - 139 cases (+2) (3 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 491 cases (+15) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 148 cases (+4)
  • Vilas - 154 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Walworth - 2,282 cases (+43) (34 deaths) (+1)
  • Washburn – 84 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Washington - 2,051 cases (+35) (32 deaths)
  • Waukesha - 6,240 cases (+70) (85 deaths)
  • Waupaca - 831 cases (+10) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Waushara - 245 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 2,168 cases (+68) (22 deaths)
  • Wood - 616 cases (+116) (3 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula*

  • Alger - 16 cases
  • Baraga - 8 cases (+1)
  • Chippewa - 44 cases
  • Delta – 206 cases (+8) (5 deaths) (+1)
  • Dickinson – 80 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 140 cases (1 death)
  • Houghton – 195 cases (+12) (1 death)
  • Iron – 50 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Keweenaw - 6 cases
  • Luce – 13 cases (+2)
  • Mackinac - 37 cases (+1)
  • Marquette - 246 cases (+3) (11 deaths)
  • Menominee - 247 cases (+6) (1 death) (+1)
  • Ontonagon – 40 cases (+2)
  • Schoolcraft - 19 cases (+1)

*The State of Michigan says it will only report county case numbers Monday-Saturday. Health officials there say weekend data are often erratic and generally lower than other days due to reduced testing and lab staffing.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol

Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

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