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UPDATE: Supreme Court to Hear Weston Prayer Death Case

By: WSAW Staff
By: WSAW Staff

The State Supreme Court will hear the case of the Weston couple convicted in the 2008 death of their daughter, Kara who died from untreated diabetes. Instead of taking her to see a doctor, Dale and Leilani Neumann chose to pray for her.

On Friday, the brief was filed in the case.

In 2009, separate juries convicted the couple of second degree reckless homicide and they were sentenced to six months in jail and 10 years on probation. They filed an appeal based on an argument that their actions are allowed under the state's faith healing law.

Last month, the attorney for Dale Neumann, Steven Miller said, "In this case, I think they just decided that there were just two many unknowns in terms of what the law is in Wisconsin and that it was better for the Supreme Court to resolve those."

Dale's attorney says it's an interesting case for the fact that there was a death, but her parents didn't mean any harm. Not to mention, the case revolves around a religious issue which implies constitutional protection.

To view all of our coverage on this case click here.


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